Welcome


NBDC is the nation’s organization for all Black disabled people.  Membership and partners includes Black disabled organizations, disabled people, parents, family members, faith based, non-profits, and academic and policy leaders.

Founded in 1990, in response to the need for Black disabled people to organize around mutual concerns, NBDC is dedicated to examining and improving; community leadership, family inclusion, entrepreneurship, civil rights, service delivery systems, education and information and Black disabled identity and culture through the lenses of ableism and racism. Select here for welcome video.


"Yes, today’s session was a tremendous first step for individual American Council of the Blind (ACB) members as well as ACB the organization. After the session today, my sister who was on the call, and I had a long conversation about our family and of our feelings on all that is happening today.  We both remembered with a mix of love and disrespect how as teenagers, an uncle of ours that we really loved would use racist words. We did call him on it, but he thought it was funny and I don’t know how much of a difference it made to him. We were so young then, but at least now as middle aged adults we know we at least said something. It was really good for me to have this conversation with her."


"I agree with MCAC members (Multicultural Committee American Council of the Blind)  that we have discovered a treasure in you (Jane Dunhamn) and I definitely want to keep in touch!" NBDC Disability Anti Racism Training Oct. 2020 for the American Council of the Blind

Mental Health is a Crime

Daniel Prude, right, and his brother, Joe.Roth and Roth LLP, via Associated Press

On March 23, just a day after having gone to the hospital for mental health problems, a 41-year-old man named Daniel Prude bolted out of his brother Joe’s home in Rochester, N.Y, wearing few clothes. Joe was scared about what might happen to his brother. So he did what many Americans do when facing an emergency involving mental illness. He called 911.

Black Funding Denied

In light of the national uprising sparked by the murders of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor (and building on other recent tragic movement moments going back to the 2014 murder of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri), NCRP is analyzing grantmaking by community foundations across the country to find out exactly how much they are – or are not – investing in Black communities.

Race, Ethnicity and Disability: The Financial Impact of Systemic Inequality and Intersectionality

Today, the U.S. is facing two concurrent crises, the COVID-19 pandemic and widespread recognition of historic and systemic racism that disproportionately impact Americans that are Black, Indigenous and People of Color (BIPOC). COVID-related hospitalization rates for nonHispanic, Black and Indigenous persons are five times that of non-Hispanic   read more

 

The Path Forward for Severe Mental Illness and Super-Utilization 

By Elizabeth Hancq

Individuals with severe mental illness are often caught in the revolving door of super-utilization, cycling through inpatient hospitals, emergency departments, jail or homeless shelters.  

Overlooked No More: Brad Lomax, a Bridge Between Civil Rights Movements

A member of the Black Panthers, he helped lead a historic, and successful, sit-in in San Francisco as part of a nationwide anti-discrimination campaign on behalf of people with disabilities.

When Brad Lomax joined the Black Panther Party in the late 1960s, he hoped to be part of a revolution that would provide a better life for Black Americans, free of inequality, poverty and police brutality. And to a large extent he succeeded, making important contributions to the Panthers on both coasts. But it was in an entirely different civil rights movement — one for people with disabilities — that he would make his most indelible mark.

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