Welcome to NBDC!


The National Black Disability Coalition (NBDC) is the nation’s organization for all Black disabled people.  Membership and partners includes Black disabled organizations, disabled people, parents, family members, faith based, non-profits, and academic and policy leaders.

Founded in 1990, in response to the need for Black disabled people to organize around mutual concerns, NBDC is dedicated to examining and improving; community leadership, family inclusion, entrepreneurship, civil rights, service delivery systems, education and information and Black disabled identity and culture through the lenses of ableism and racism.

From The Director's Desk


NBDC often receives e-mails from individuals regarding how they or family members are treated during accessing service delivery systems or inquiries about services or interviews about our experiences. Recently, because of the e-mail (click here) NBDC has committed, for documentation purposes, to interview folks on their experiences.

Please keep a look out for the interviews and let us hear from you.Select to read our letters!

Peace and Blessings.

Jane

Two brothers did 31 years for someone else’s crime. Then things went bad.

04-10-2018 -- Henry Lee McCollum, seated, and his half-brother, Leon Brown, were released  prison after DNA evidence exonerated them in the 1983 rape and murder of an 11-year-old girl Travis Dove for The New York Times 

In 2015, the state of North Carolina paid $750,000 to Henry McCollum to compensate for the 30 years the innocent man spent on death row.

Seven months later, he was broke. McCollum, who is intellectually disabled, then began borrowing money at 38 percent interest. He kept his financial plight hidden from friends and supporters from his death row years.

But in th...read more


What did it mean when non-disabled slaves were set free?



Slavery ended in the US after the Thirteenth Amendment was ratified on December 6, 1865; however, disabled slaves were kept on plantations because slavery was connected to the ability to work.  Jim Downs, among other scholars, wrote an essay entitled, The Continuation of Slavery: The Experience of Disabled Slaves during Emancipation which lays out that disabled slaves were seen as non-workers, could not work therefore were kept on plantations to be "taking care of" but continue to work for their “masters”.



Did this s...read more

CategoryArts and Culture
Age16
HometownHackensack, N.J.
EducationManhattan School of Music, Emerson Junior-Senior High School

It’s hard to not compare musical prodigy Matthew Whitaker to legendary musician Stevie Wonder. Matthew, who taught Image of Matthew Whitakerhimself to play “Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star” at just 3 years old and plays the piano effortlessly and with so much soul, is also blind.

“I don’t let my blindness stop ...read more

Abstract:

This article situates recent policy proposals designed to expand the technological surveillance and policing of the "wandering" tendencies ascribed to autistic subjects in relationship to longer histories involving the surveillance of blackness and disability, and maintains that that such proposals are inadequate to sustaining the persistence and flourishing of autistic and other neurologically divergent forms-of-life. Drawing from discussions of the politics of bodily movement in black studies, performance theory, and the emerging discourses of neurodiversity, the essay argues for the necessity of cultivating alternative approaches to conceptualizing, representing, a...read more

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Disability Inclusion Tool Kit

Disability Inclusion Toolkit

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"Black, Gifted & Disabled"

​Interview Series


NBDC member Leroy F. Moore, Jr. speaks with Kevin Powell. Listen to the interview by navigating to the image below:


Select this image to hear the interview